Skip to main content

We are conveniently located across the street from Tri-State Outfitters

Menu
Home » What's New » Bifocal and Multifocal Contact Lenses 

Bifocal and Multifocal Contact Lenses 

If you are over 40 and have difficulty seeing close up, you probably have a common age-related condition called presbyopia which is when the eye’s natural lens loses the ability to focus on close objects. Presbyopia is a natural process that occurs as the eye ages and affects the majority of people from age 40 and upward. Individuals with presbyopia are often familiar with the need to hold reading materials such as newspapers an arm’s length away from their eyes in order to see clearly, yet reading glasses with bifocal or multifocal (such as progressive) lenses can help.

Fortunately for those who don’t like the look, feel or inconvenience of reading glasses, there is another option. Bifocal and multifocal lenses are also available in contact lenses in both soft and Rigid Gas Permeable (RGP) varieties.

Multifocal contact lenses give you added freedom over glasses and they allow you to be able to view any direction - up, down and to the sides - with similar vision. People wearing progressive lenses in glasses on the other hand have to look over their glasses if they want to view upwards or into the distance.

Multifocal contact lenses are generally designed in one of two ways, as either simultaneous vision lenses or alternating vision lenses.

Simultaneous Vision Lenses

The most popular version of multifocal contact lenses, simultaneous vision lenses present the distance and near vision zones of the lens at the same time. Typically after a short adjustment period your eyes learn to utilize the segment of the lens that they need to focus on the desired object and essentially ignore the other.

Translating or Alternating Vision lenses

Similar to bifocal eyeglass lenses, these contacts are divided into distinct areas or zones and your pupil will move to the desired zone depending on your vision needs. Typically the top of the lens, which is what you look through when looking straight ahead is for distance vision and the bottom area (what you look through when you look down) is for near vision. However, this can be reversed according to unique vision needs.

An Alternative Option to Multifocal Contact Lenses: Monovision

Monovision is another contact lens alternative for presbyopia particularly if you are having difficulty adapting to multifocal lenses.  Monovision splits your distance and near vision between your eyes, using your dominant eye for distance vision and your non-dominant  eye for near vision.

Typically you will use single vision lenses in each eye however sometimes the dominant eye will use a single vision lens while a multifocal lens will be used in the other eye for intermediate and near vision. This is called modified monovision.  Your eye doctor will perform a test to determine which type of lens is best suited for each eye and optimal vision.

Are Contact Lenses Right for You?

If you have presbyopia, contact lenses may be a great option for you. Many people prefer the look and convenience of contact lenses over traditional reading glasses. Speak to your eye doctor about the options available to you.

x

To our valued patients,

During these challenging times, we feel it’s especially important to keep you informed of what we are doing to keep you safe. The health and safety of our patients is our primary goal. The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic remains fluid and as such we have made the following changes in our clinic as we strive to maintain the highest standards of care for you our patients:

* Modified schedule. Anyone entering the clinic will need an appointment. There will only be one patient allowed in the clinic at one time to ensure social distancing. Other family members are not permitted in. You can continue to call the clinic to make these appointments. Seniors 60 and over will kindly be asked to reschedule for a safer time in the future.

* All patients must sign a form declaring that they do not have a fever, sore throat, cough, runny nose and other flu-like symptoms including aches and pains. They also must declare that they are practicing social distancing in accordance with the Governor of Washington’s mandate.

* All common surfaces will be disinfected in accordance with current guidelines and protocols after each and every patient and before a new patient enters the clinic. This includes instruments and eyeglass frames that have been handled.

Thank you for your patience and understanding during this difficult time. Our thoughts and prayers are with you. Together, we will get through this.

Warmest regards,

Dr. Osborne and staff